One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

Under the cover of dark Afghan night, a Taliban detachment is being deployed on a mission. The task is extremely simple: dozens of mojaheds armed to the teeth must break through the British checkpoint with one watch. They are already looking forward to an easy victory, but ... Gurkh is in charge - the warrior of the most violent people of Asia.

Mal Nepali and angry

Life in the mountains is not sugar, and mountain peoples have always been distinguished by their special endurance, perseverance and belligerence. Huge empires more than once broke off their teeth and lost armies in inhospitable mountains. But what is the Swiss Alps or even the Caucasus before the highest mountain range in the world - the Himalayas?

In such unfriendly conditions, only the most resistant survives. These are the Nepalese warriors.

The Nepalese were so severe that even the British Empire at the peak of power took only a year to understand - it's better to fight for us than against.

In 1814, the British army entered Nepal for the first time, and in 1815, the British announced the call of local soldiers to serve.A year later, Nepal became a vassal of the British crown and serves it to this day.

Nepalese warriors were not ordinary mercenaries. They have always been proud of their honor, martial art, and sought battle to show themselves. Service in the British army was an excellent way for them to demonstrate their best qualities and earn good money. Gurkha participated in all the wars of Great Britain right up to the present day, and for two centuries there was no chance that their units would change their crown at least once - even after the collapse of the Empire.

In Nepal, there are several different nations, but Gurkhas (after the kingdom that united the Nepalese) are called soldiers recruited from mountainous areas. Residents of the lowlands of Nepal are considered too pampered and are not even considered.

The selection procedure is often called one of the toughest in the world. It includes extreme physical training, and units are prepared for service in the most difficult climatic conditions: in the jungle, mountains or desert. Sometimes more than a hundred Gurkhas are recorded for one place in the British army, there are even whole family dynasties.

But do not think that after so many years in the European army, they "civilized" and became lazy.Already during the current war in Afghanistan, Nepalis often got into trouble for, for example, taking the heads of killed enemies as trophies. What were they going to do with them later? Hang on the walls?

17 minutes of fame and hell

September 2010. Dark Afghan night. The sentry, Sergeant Dipprasad Poon, heard a suspicious noise and decided to check - perhaps this is some kind of animal. Finding a bunch of unknown, crawling around the post, the Nepalese demanded that they introduce themselves. They did just that - firing from the Kalashnikovs and a volley from the RPG. Gurkh realized that he faced a many times superior opponent.

After he described it in an interview:“At that moment I was not worried, there was no other choice but to fight. The Taliban were everywhere, and I was alone. There were so many of them that I thought - I would die for sure. Then I decided that I would kill them as much as I can - before they kill me. ”

Poon collected all the weapons that were on duty, sat down on the roof and began methodically discharging them into the Mujahideen.

Despite the numerical superiority of the enemy, surrounded on all sides by the Gurkh, he took the initiative, changed positions and tried to fight back on all fronts.But he could not be everywhere and immediately. One of the Taliban went around him and climbed onto the post. Poon noticed a shadow approaching from behind, turned around sharply and stuffed the enemy with a lead from a machine gun. When all the ammunition for the machine gun ran out, grenades and an L85 assault rifle were used.

In the midst of the battle Dipprasad noticed that another enemy was climbing to him. The Nepalese wanted to throw a bag of sand at him, but he, as luck would have it, broke and fell apart. Then Poon unhooked the rack from the machine gun, which was already standing idle, and launched into the Taliban. Mojahed did not live to see those beautiful times when NATO machine-gun racks were replaced with new lightweight ones - the old one weighed seven kilograms and cut its skull.

It is not known whether Poon knew about the long international disputes over the inhumanity of anti-personnel mines of directional action, but he had one such mine - “Claymore”. When the enemies came very close, he did not show humanism, but chose the direction of the explosion better. A charge of shrapnel in 700 steel balls instantly turned the brave Taliban into stuffing.

A quarter of an hour after the start of the battle, the commander, Major Sean Chandler, arrived at the post.The digging Nepali recounted the remaining ammunition, prepared to repel a new attack, and reported on the attack of a group of 20-30 Taliban.

But it turned out that there was no one to fight.

By this time, those few mojaheds who were not caught in the rain from bullets and grenades understood that something had gone wrong. All the most courageous were already a sieve, and there were no more people willing to visit the paradise gardens ahead of time. The remnants of the squad retreated so quietly that Poon did not even notice.

Later, according to a survey of local residents, they found out that the attackers were, most likely, fifteen. That, of course, does not detract from the heroism of Sergeant Pune.

The battlefield is left for the lonely brave Gurkha.

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  • One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban

    One soldier in the field: Nepali Rambo vs Taliban