Myths and truth about powdered wine

Myths and truth about powdered wine

By purchasing cheap Russian-made wine, buyers are often interested in whether it is "powder". Let us see where the legend of "powder wine" came from and how true it is.

Usually, “powdery” is considered to be cheap wine produced by a Russian producer, a little known to the general public. It is understood that in its production, instead of fermenting grape must, a certain "wine powder" is used, which is diluted with water with the addition of alcohol. Opinions differ on the composition of this powder: in the opinion of optimists, “wine powder” is produced by evaporation of grape juice and is a whole natural product. Pessimists are confident that it is made by mixing sugar, citric acid, food coloring and all kinds of flavors.

How true is this legend and what is it based on?

First, after the collapse of the USSR, the majority of wine-making regions — Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia, and Armenia — turned out to be beyond the borders of Russia.Although in recent years, domestic viticulture and winemaking has been developing very actively, which is supported by government support measures, so far the wine produced in Russia from grapes grown here covers only about 30% of the market needs. About the same or a little less is accounted for by bottled imports - but imported wines are much more expensive and not affordable for all consumers.

Myths and truth about powdered wine

The remaining market share is occupied by Russian-made wines (and according to the law, the bottling line is considered to be the place of production of alcoholic beverages), which are made from imported wine materials purchased from different countries and imported into the country in bulk, these wine materials are called bulk in the winemaking slang.

The term "wine" means dry wine, intended for further processing. In the simplest case, it is simply bottled and put on sale, but can be blended, i.e. to mix different varieties to get a more interesting bouquet, to stand in oak barrels or to subject to champagne - almost all inexpensive sparkling wines produced in Russia are made from beams.

Most of these wines are produced at obscure wineries located near major cities — during Soviet industrialization they were placed closer to consumers and skilled labor, and raw materials could be imported from any region.

Such wines are mostly quite acceptable quality, although claims to them are still not uncommon. The fact is that bulk is usually purchased on the spot market, where it will be cheaper, one lot from Spain - the other from Chile or Moldova. Therefore, there are frequent cases when, when trying to get the wine he likes, the buyer encounters a drink that is completely different to his taste - albeit spilled in the exact same bottle. On the counter label, on the reverse side, you can read the inscription in small print: "Made from dry wine material."

Myths and truth about powdered wine

A person who is far from familiarizing himself with the intricacies of winemaking technologies immediately comes up with some kind of concentrated powder - although at the same time, while reading “dry wine” on the label, he does not expect anything like “powder” under the cork. This is one of the reasons for the legend of "powder wine".

There is another.In the 90s, in the markets of the coastal resort settlements in the Crimea, on the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus, in the southern regions of Ukraine, semi-underground trade in cheap "homemade wine" in plastic bottles was very widespread. Sometimes it really was a simple home-made "dried", but very often enterprising merchants simply took the dry concentrate, popular in those days, like "Invita" or "Yuppi" and diluted it with water and vodka.

The wine obtained liquid was not - in modern terms, it was a typical surrogate - but it was moderately sweet, moderately sour and contained alcohol. Among the inexperienced holidaymakers, who were interested primarily in the alcohol content, and not the taste and aroma, these surrogates, due to their cheapness, diverged with a bang. And the entire local district knew that "Baba Manya was driving wine out of powder."

Myths and truth about powdered wine

Actually, these two very real reasons, bizarrely united in the mass consciousness, and gave rise to the myth of "powder wine." And to what extent is it possible and realistic to produce wine - a real wine, and not a surrogate - from any "dry concentrates"? After all, are they used for the production of juices and nectars concentrated juices delivered from exotic countries? ..

Firstly, the cost of one liter of imported wine materials is about $ 0.6–0.8, or about 40–50 rubles for our money, but in some cases (low quality, excess yield, etc.) it may turn out to be below. There is no economic sense for manufacturers to bother with “evaporation” and subsequent “recovery”. The cost of the "production" of such a wine is reduced in the simplest case to bottling and labeling and is more than beaten off even in the lowest-budget segment.

Defective wine material, which has obvious flaws in taste and aroma and is unsuitable for direct bottling, can be purchased even cheaper. To correct the taste, sweeteners are added to it (as a rule, ordinary sugar), acidity regulators (citric acid), and other ingredients. Often, the content of the original wine stock in such a drink is only 50% of the volume.

Myths and truth about powdered wine

The law does not allow to call the resulting product wine, and it is labeled as a "wine drink" - on the shelves of chain stores you can find similar swipes in paper bags for about 100 rubles per liter, if not cheaper.It is perfectly safe for health, however, it is not necessary to speak about any taste qualities. Such products also find their consumer among the hunters for cheap degrees.

At the same time, the level of state control over the alcohol industry in Russia today is extremely high, and none of the legal manufacturers will risk an expensive license for the sake of worthless benefits. Than to chemize with “powders”, it is much easier to drive cheap Shmurdyak by writing “wine drink” on the label.

There is one more thing - technological. In the process of making wine, during the yeast fermentation, there is not only the processing of natural grape sugar contained in the wort into alcohol, but also many other chemical processes. As a result, natural wine - no matter good or bad - does not at all resemble the taste of grape juice. And to prepare the "wine" by adding water and alcohol to the concentrate of grape juice, whether it is dry or pasty, is impossible. You can easily verify this yourself: take a packet of grape juice, add some vodka there and try.You will get vodka with grape juice, and the resulting cocktail will be completely different.

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  • Myths and truth about powdered wine

    Myths and truth about powdered wine

    Myths and truth about powdered wine

    Myths and truth about powdered wine

    Myths and truth about powdered wine

    Myths and truth about powdered wine

    Myths and truth about powdered wine

    Myths and truth about powdered wine

    Myths and truth about powdered wine

    Myths and truth about powdered wine

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