Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

The British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums (BIAZA) published a list of reptiles and amphibians that fell under the preservation measures of these species in UK zoos and avoided extinction thanks to zoos, among them the frog that does not croak and the world's largest lizards.

1. Komodo dragon: a member of the lizard family, the Komodo lizard is the largest species of lizard on earth. For the first time, scientists wrote about him in 1910. The lizard can grow up to 3 meters long, the weight of the lizard can reach up to 70 kg. Because of their size, these lizards dominate the ecosystems in which they live. Komodo lizards hunt and ambush their prey: invertebrates, birds and mammals. They have two glands in the lower jaw, which secrete several toxic proteins, so it is believed that their bite is poisonous.1

2. Chicken Frog: Named to the taste of its meat, the chicken frog lives mainly in lowlands, and not in the mountains. It can grow up to 21 centimeters long, which makes it one of the largest frog species in the world.2
3Axolotl: This creature is often called a "water monster" or "walking fish." However, the axolotl is actually an amphibian - not a fish, because they reach sexual maturity without being subjected to metamorphosis. Instead of developing the lungs and going out on land, adult individuals are left to live in water and without scales.3
4. Orange-sided frog: It is a rare frog, with a green body, black eyes, red or pink belly. Orange-boiled tree frogs are found in humid subtropics, flat mountain forests and wetlands of Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Belize and Honduras. The frog population is rapidly decreasing due to chitridiomycosis, an infectious disease that kills amphibians. They breed in temporary or permanent reservoirs.4
5. Madagascar turtle beak: One of the rarest tortoises in the world. The estimated population of these turtles is from 440 to 770 individuals. The population is rapidly declining. The risk of complete extinction of this species is extremely high: it is believed that this species of turtles may disappear from the wild in the next 10-15 years.5
6. Rough frog (Hylomantis lemur): These rough frog are so small that they can easily fit on the tip of your finger! Males are about 3 cm in length, and females are slightly larger: up to 4 cm.Both sexes have a weak muscular structure, which gives them a fragile appearance. Their movements are slow; pawing a few jumps and rest; greenish yellow to hide during the day, by nightfall they become red-brown. At night, they are most active. Lemur - part of the Latin name, meaning "spirit" or "ghost." This Latin name is combined with their nightly silent movements and bulging eyes.6
7. Golden Mantell: This frog is about 2.5 cm long with a typical golden orange color. Mostly live in groups of three individuals. Mantilla spends the whole day searching for food. Its food consists of insects ants, worms and termites. A bright color is this natural defense against predators, as it repeats the color of some poisonous species of frogs.7
8. Woody Maskaren boa: a snake from the Mascarena boas family. Can grow up to 150cm. The snake has a dark brown color on the back, abdomen lighter with dark spots. In 24 hours, the boa changes its color from dark, during its relatively inactive period in the afternoon, to light, from evening to dawn, when boa is most active.8
9.Sand lizard or common lizard is the only species that lays eggs in burrows dug by females in June and July in loose sand. Eggs hatch about 1-2 months depending on weather conditions. When young lizards grow up, they can reach lengths from 16 to 20 cm.9
10. Algerian leggy skink: Usually found in the Maghreb region of North Africa: from the main part of Mediterranean Morocco to northwestern Algeria. They prefer to settle in dry meadows, light forests, coastal areas, forests, and on lands intended for agriculture with land cover. This is an egg-laying species.

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  • Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA

    Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA Amphibians rescued from extinction by the association BIAZA